Reusable Baby!

Disposable nappies & wipes


Lets just say...Cloth nappies make sense and cents!


When my son was first born, he was getting changed around 8 – 10 times per day.  Over a week that is 80 nappies…wow, before you know it you have a whole rubbish bin of poop filled nappies every week - plus imagine the drain on our wallets...

Originally we tried the old flat nappies when we first got home from hospital and after a bit of awkward origami, we both gave up.  Had I known there were some awesomely easy newborn folds along with the modern version of a pin called a snappi or a nappi nippa, the flat nappies could more than likely have been one of our favorites.

It wasn’t until my friend Paula, who was originally from Australia showed me some very cute, easy to use cloth nappies that had Velcro, no pins and you didn’t need to soak them, that I decided to have a go with modern cloth nappies. 

We brought 4 different nappies (different brand and different styles) and gave it a go.  It was amazing!  We had always found that because Daniel has little chicken legs (he still does even now at 9 years old) that the disposables leaked all of the time.  As soon as we changed to the “New’ Cloth nappies, we had less leakage and the nappies that we chose were better at containing even the biggest, nastiest poonami!

This meant that we were actually doing less washing because we were just washing a cloth nappy not a full set of clothes and bedding, which was often the case when he had what we called one of his poonami’s in a disposable. 

So the cloth nappies not only contained ‘everything’ better, they were much easier to use than what we expected.  We also loved that you could get all sorts of colours and patterns.

For most of the time Daniel was in nappies, I used cloth nappies about 80% of the time and disposables 20% of the time like when we were out and about or on holiday.

We viewed the disposable nappies as a convenience item not a day to day product.  When you think about it, they are too expensive for daily use and our parents never used them every day, they were a luxury item that they used just when they were out and about or on holiday.

Today too many disposable products have become mainstream and essentially pushed the reusable products out and had succeeded in making them alternative products instead of the other way around.

At what point did the human race lose their ability to see that a reusable product requires less production and creates less waste that then hundreds or thousands of products that are created in a single use item instead of the reusable item.

A good example of this is disposable coffee cups.  At what point did they become a good replacement for a cup that can be used hundreds of times.
 

Re-usable wipes



Reusable cloth wipes are a great alternative to buying disposable wipes!

Washable wipes are all I ever used.  I purchased 24 terry wipes when my son was born and only ever used them with water, saving myself hundreds of dollars. Water works wonders on bottoms! I never used a solution with them and generally used 1-2 wipes per change. When I have had to use disposable wipes while out, I found I was using at least 10 to 20 wipes per change because they are so small and flimsy.

Washable wipes can also be made by cutting up a towel or buying some fabric to make your own. Mine are around the same size as a face cloth.

 

Flushable wipes


How flushable are they?
Just 1 cloth nappy would replace this many disposables

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Nappy Days